Saturday, September 20, 2014

New Batiks Are In :)

We just got a bunch of new batiks in! So many in fact that we can't fit them all into one post :) As usual these batiks are priced $8.75 a yard. The new pink, purple, red, orange, yellow, and brown batiks are pictured in this post. Check back soon to see more of our new batiks.




Check Out Our New Batik Jelly Rolls!

These jelly rolls (40- 2 1/2" strips) are priced at $29.99 a piece and contain only batiks. They are sure to not last long, so stop by the shop and buy yours before it is too late.

"Neptune's Bounty"


"Romance & Roses"


 
"Purple Haze"
 

"Forest Dreams"

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

New Moda Fabrics!

These new Moda fabrics are perfect for Quilts of Valor. We are selling all of these for $8.50 per yard.







Toby the Tech, Bringing Your Weekly Tip!

Toby wants you to get out there and quilt!
Toby the Tech, bringing you tips and techniques to prevent tantrums by helping with thread tangles, triangles, and all your sewing trials and tribulations!

Last week Toby taught us how to calculate the yardage needed for binding (you can find that post here ), and this week he would like to continue on with that theme and share his tips on how to bind a quilt.There are a few different ways out there to bind a quilt, but in this post Toby will only be explaining his preferred method.

So you followed Toby's advice in the last post, got all of your binding strips cut, and now you're wondering what's next. Well don't worry Toby is here to help with that too, all you have to do is follow his simple steps for putting on a quilt binding:

1) Sew your binding strips together. Before you can begin binding your quilt, the strips must be sewn together to make one long strip of binding. To do this, join your binding strips at a 45 degree angle (refer to figure 1), unless they are bias strips in which case they are already trimmed at 45 degree angles and simply need to be matched up. While it may be tempting to just sew your binding strips end to end, this is a big no no as doing so will cause big lumps in your binding. If you haven't already cut off your selvage edges, be sure to overlap your binding strips in such a way the selvage edges will be trimmed off. Make sure your lay your binding strips right-sides together, and leave an overlap, as long as you follow figure 1 you should be just fine. After your strips are sewn together, trim off the excess fabric, leaving a 1/4" seam (refer to figure 1).
Figure 1
2) Press your seams and fold your binding in half. Pressing your seam allowances open helps prevent lumps in your binding and keeps it looking nice (for more information and tips on pressing check out this Toby the Tech post). Before you can sew your binding on you must first fold your strip in half lengthwise (for those of you who remember elementary school that's the hotdog way ;) ). Toby recommends pressing as you fold to make things easier.

3) Make sure your quilt edge is trimmed up. If you haven't done so already, trim the excess backing and batting so that it is even with the quilt top. Square off the corners and straighten the sides if needed.

4) Begin sewing on your binding. Choose a beginning point somewhere on a side of your quilt (don't start at the edge). Line up the raw edge of your binding strip with the edge of your quilt, making sure to sew the binding strip to the front of the quilt (refer to figure 2). Begin stitching (leaving a 4-5" tail) your binding on using a 1/4" seam (refer to figure 2). If you will be mitering the corner, stop stitching about 1/4" from the corner, back-stitch a few stitches, and remove your quilt from the machine, making sure to trim your thread tails. Toby prefers mitered corners for binding so he will explain how to do one in the next step.
Figure 2
5) Mitering your corners. After your project has been removed from the machine, fold your binding straight up over itself (refer to step 1 of figure 3), forming a 45 degree angle to the corner. Next fold your binding straight down, making sure the fold lines up evenly with the edge (refer to step 2 of figure 2). Pin in place and continue sewing, using a 1/4" seam. Repeat the process on the rest of the corners.
Figure 3

6) Joining the ends of your binding. When you get 5-6" from the starting point, back-stitch a few stitches, and remove the quilt from the machine. This part can get a little tricky but essentially you will be doing the same thing you did when you joined all of your binding strips together. Unfold the two ends of the strips, join at a 45 degree angle (right-sides together), sew, and trim of the excess fabric leaving a 1/4" seam (refer to figure 4). After the two ends are sewn together, fold them in half (like you did originally) and sew on the same as you did the rest of the binding using a 1/4" seam.
Figure 4

7) Finish binding your quilt. Once you have the binding sewn onto the top and the two edges joined its time to finish binding your quilt. Simply fold the binding in half over to the back (make sure your corners are poked out good) and hand sew into place.



That's all Toby has for now. Be sure to check back next week because Toby has an important announcement to make! If you are having any problems that you think Toby can help with, please let him know in the comments (you can even do it anonymously without a creating a Google account), or stop by the shop and tell Shelby as she is Toby's secretary and does all of his typing for him (it can be very hard to type with fuzzy little paws).

 P.S. Toby would love to hear feedback from you (including comments on Toby's fashion sense ;) ). Let him know if you think he is doing a good job, or if he has things which he could improve on. Just leave him a comment :) 

More Florals!

Summer may be ending but you can enjoy the beauty of it year round with these florals :)

This collection is called "Serenity Garden" and is by Wilmington Prints. We are selling these for $8.00 per yard.

This lovely, large, rose print is made by South Sea Imports. We are selling it for $8.00 per yard.

This is another fabric by Wilmington Prints and we are selling it for $8.00 per yard.

We caught Toby playing with the mirror, and he discovered that the black floral would make an excellent four-patch posy or kaleidoscope quilt :)
Uh-oh, Toby is busted!
An example of a four-patch posy block (this image was created by using a mirror)
An example of a kaleidoscope block (this image was created by using a mirror)
An example of a four-patch posy block (this image was created by using a mirror)

An example of a kaleidoscope block (this image was created by using a mirror)
Thank you Toby for these wonderful suggestions!

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Check Out These Landscape Fabrics

We are opening bird season early here at the Quilt shop and in preparation we have fully stocked up on pheasant fabric and plenty of other landscape fabrics to help you bag the perfect fall project. Be sure to check back later to see what Shelby makes with the stunning pheasant panel.

The photo doesn't do this panel justice. We are selling it for $5.69 per panel (one panel is pictured here).

We are selling this lovely all over pheasant print for $8.50 per yard.

No fall landscape project would be complete without some appropriate vegetation. This fall foliage pint (on the left) has long been a shop favorite that we just got back in stock. This brown scrub brush print (in the middle) would be the perfect place for flushing out pheasants. This new grass print (on the right) is the perfect color for use in fall themed projects. We are selling all three for $8.50 per yard.


We have also gotten in some more general landscape fabrics that would be good for any of your landscape projects :)
This underwater rock print (on the left) would be perfect for the bottom of a fishing stream or pond. This large rock print (on the right) is very multipurpose. We are selling both of these for $8.50 per yard.

Any project using this sky print (on the left) will remind of sunny summer days and this basket weave print (on the right) would look beautiful as a picnic basket or basket of flowers. We are selling the sky fabric for $8.00 per yard and the basket weave fabric for $8.50 per yard.

This barn border fabric is just the thing to finish off any barnyard or country scene project. We are selling it for $8.00 per yard.


Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Toby the Tech, Bringing Your Weekly Tip

Toby trying on his fall wardrobe ;)
Toby the Tech, bringing you tips and techniques to prevent tantrums by helping with thread tangles, triangles, and all your sewing trials and tribulations!

This week Toby would like to share his knowledge on how to calculate the amount of material needed for binding a quilt.
The binding is the last thing we ever think about on a quilt but it is far from the least important as it is what finishes a quilt. 

There are two ways to cut binding, on the straight of grain, or on the bias, and the amount of fabric needed for each way differs. Most quilters use double-fold straight grain binding for their quilts. Bias binding is used on curved edged quilts or to create special effects (for example a stripped fabric produces a barber-pole effect). 

Whichever type of binding you choose, Toby has tips on how to calculate the amount of fabric needed for both:


Straight-Grain Binding
 Binding strips are usually cut anywhere from 2" to 2 1/2" wide, depending on personal preference. Here at the shop we usually cut our binding at 2 1/2" wide, so that is the number we will be using in the following example. The formula for calculating how much fabric you need for straight grain binding is quite simple, take the perimeter of your quilt (obtain this by adding your length and width then multiply by 2) plus 12", then divide that number by the usable width of the fabric (usually 40"), this will give you the number of strips you need. 
For example you have a quilt that measures 74 1/2" by 86". The first thing you need to do is add 74.5 and 86, this will give you 160.5. Now multiply that by 2 to get your perimeter, which in this example will be 321". Next you add 12" (unless you are mitering the corners, then you add 24"), which will give you 333" (this is the length of your binding). Now that you have the length of your binding, you need to calculate the number of strips you will need. To do this simply divide the length of your binding by the usable width of the fabric, in our example we would divide 333 by 40 which would give us 8.325, rounded that gives us 9 strips. Then if you need to calculate the yardage (for example you are buying the fabric from a quilt shop), you multiply the number of strips by the cut width of the strips. In our example we would multiply 9 by 2.5 giving us 22 1/2" which is a little under 2/3 of a yard.

Bias Binding 
Bias binding is made in the same way as straight-grain binding, except the strips are cut at a 45 degree angle to the selvage. This allows the binding to stretch and bend without creating puckers (this is why it is used on curved edged quilts). Unlike the formula for straight-grain binding, the formula for bias binding is very complicated and requires the use of a scientific calculator. Luckily there are many charts available online that will tell you the yardage you need based on the calculated length of binding (in our example above the calculated length of binding was 333"). Here is the yardage needed for some common binding lengths (using 2 1/2" binding strips):
Binding Length                    Yardage Needed                    Approx. Strips
 222"                                    1/2 yard                                      6
300"                                     5/8 yard                                      8
330"                                     5/8 yard                                      9
352"                                     5/8 yard                                      9
404"                                      3/4 yard                                    10

While these are common numbers, there is a good chance that your binding length will be different, in a case like that I recommend using a binding calculator (there is a good one over at Quilter's Paradise) or using a handy chart that can be found in many different books (and a few online too).



That's all Toby has for now as he is off to try on the rest of his fall and winter wardrobe (as you can see in the picture, at least some of his shirts don't fit anymore) Be sure to check back next week for
Toby's tips on putting the binding on your quilt! If you are having any problems that you think Toby can help with, please let him know in the comments (you can even do it anonymously without a creating a Google account), or stop by the shop and tell Shelby as she is Toby's secretary and does all of his typing for him (it can be very hard to type with fuzzy little paws).

 P.S. Toby would love to hear feedback from you (including comments on Toby's fashion sense ;) ). Let him know if you think he is doing a good job, or if he has things which he could improve on. Just leave him a comment :)